links and miscellany

Boone County, Kentucky

Boone County, Kentucky, 1899

 

Boone County, Kentucky Boone County, Kentucky    
Boone County, Kentucky, 1935
red lines are roads, 
black lines are railroads
Boone County, Kentucky
from a 1940 magisterial
district map

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Boone County was the 35th county formed in Kentucky.  The law enacting Boone County was passed on December 13, 1798. The county was formed on June 1, 1799 from Campbell County. Its boundaries are unchanged since March 10, 1870. It has an area of 246.2 square miles, making it the 87th largest of Kentucky's 120 counties. 

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In 1876, the R. L. Polk Company published The Kentucky State Gazetteer and Business Directory, which listed information about virtually every town in Kentucky.  The listings from Boone County are these:

Bullitsville

Burlington

Grant (Belleview)

Hamilton

Hebron

Petersburg

Union

 

Verona

Walton


A later Polk Gazetteer, from 1883-84, lists these Boone County communities:

Beaver

Bullitsville

Burlington

Constance

Florence

Grant

Hamilton

Hebron

Petersburg

Rabbit Hash

Richwood

Union

Verona

Walton


A later, 1895 Gazetteer adds: An earlier, pre-Civil War Gazetteer from 1859 lists details on
only these three Boone County locations:
Richwood Limaburg Florence Beaver Lick Rabbit Hash

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Memberships Lists of the Masonic Lodges of 1911 in these Boone County locations are here: (pdf's)
Big Bone Belleview Burlington Hebron Union Walton

G. W. Hawes' 1861 Commercial Gazetteer and Business Directory of the Ohio River gives these descriptions of Boone County's Ohio River towns.

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The Boone County Historical Society's old web site is here; their new one is here.

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For the attempted rape of a Walton girl, William Scales was taken from the Burlington jail to
Florence to be hung.  Judge Lynch presiding.  The story's here.

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“That we have too many pistols engaged in adjusting disputes in the country, and especially in this county, is a deplorable fact, which is attested to by the frequent display of these peace makers (?), if not by bringing them into use also.”   The Boone County Recorder, February 22, 1898

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“It will be remembered that about ten years ago [March 28, 1859], the steamers Nat. Holmes and David Gibson, the one ascending and the other descending the Ohio river, collided a short distance above Aurora.  The Holmes was a complete wreck, many lives were lost, and a large amount of property were destroyed.” from Lawrenceburg, Indiana's The Register, May 28, 1868.

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The 1878 Biographical Encyclopedia of Kentucky
 had these entries for folks with a Boone County connection (all pdf's)

B. G. Willis

H. C. White

J. P. Gaines

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Boone County, Kentucky Boone County, Kentucky Boone County, Kentucky
Winfield Cottage at Piatt's Landing.  Piatt's Landing is now part of the East Bend Power Plant. This was the
Robert Piatt home.
The Jacob Piatt home, Federal Hall, above the river, north of Petersburg.
It burned down in the 1970's.
The Benjamin Piatt Fowler House on old 42 in Union. This 1970 drawing is by Linda Hughes
There were three Piatt houses in Boone County.

“Jacob Wykoff Piatt, a distinguished member of the Hamilton county Bar, died at his residence in Boone county, Kentucky, on Thursday evening last. Mr. Piatt was born in the year 1800, in the same house in which he died - a fine old stone mansion on the banks of the Ohio, nearly opposite the mouth of the Miami, built by his grandfather, and one of the first residences erected in Kentucky.” Daily State Sentinel, Indianapolis, June 8, 1857

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In 1900, John James Piatt edited and published a book of various pieces he called The Hesperian Tree: An Annual of the Ohio Valley - 1900.  The entire text is online at Google Books, here.

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A couple of items from Piatt's book deal with Northern Kentucky history.  The first is a chapter John Uri Lloyd wrote for, but did not include, in his Stringtown on the Pike.  It’s about two tramps walking down the Ohio River on the Indiana shore, and the dialogue between them. One explains to the other features and facts about the Kentucky side of the river.  It’s a pdf, and you can read it here

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The second is a series of four short pieces by Kenneth Lake: one lamenting the loss of the ability to whip slaves at the whipping post, a feud between two men, the wonderful saga of the Petersburg Racing Association, and last but not least an account of fox hunting in Boone County.  It’s a pdf also, and it’s here.

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The back pages of the book feature advertisements with blurbs from reviews that say very nice things about Mr. Piatt's and Mrs. Piatt's poetry.  The blurbs had a higher opinion of it than we do.

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“Three slaves, two men and a woman, belonging to Mr. Piatt, who lives in Kentucky, just across the river from our city, ran away from their owner on Tuesday night of last week.  They got as far up in Ohio as Bellefontaine, where they were recognized and arrested by a brother of Mr. Piatt, at whose house they had stopped to get something to eat.  A dispatch, stating the arrest, having reached the owner of the slaves, he started, accompanied by five men, for Bellefontaine, but got there in time to be too late to get his property.  The abolitionists had taken them by force and sent them on their way, and Mr. P. had to return without their desirable company.”  the Independent Press of Lawrenceburg, Indiana, November 10, 1852

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“We understand that Mr. A. S. Piatt is about to commence a suit against the Little Miami Railroad Co. to recover the value of slaves that recently escaped from his estate in Kentucky.”  the Independent Press of Lawrenceburg, Indiana,  December 1, 1859.

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Dolphin

Rising Sun Times, 1837

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$100 Reward

The WPA Writers Project from the late 1930's conducted a number of interviews with ex-slaves.  The only one from Boone County is this one (pdf), but we suggest you take everything it says with a large grain of salt.  The Uncle Tom's  Cabin references are just flat wrong.
“The slaveholders of Boone county held a meeting at Florence on Saturday last, for the purpose of taking such measures as will protect their property from the Abolitionists.” Louisville Daily Courier, February 27, 1856 Legal case of a Boone County man named Harper sets legal precedents for slaves, here.
“A Negro named Scales, who had just been discharged from the Cincinnati Workhouse and had obtained employment  on a farm in Boone County, Ky., made brutal assault last Saturday upon the 5-year-old daughter of a poor man named Lundsford.  The Negro knew that the child was alone in the house before he entered it.  As the Negro threatened to kill her is she told, the little one did not tell her mother until the pain compelled the disclosure.  Scales was arrested and with difficulty taken to the Burlington Jail.  Last night a mob gathered at Florence, and in wagons and on horseback went to Burlington, broke into the jail, carried the Negro to the woods on the turnpike road, and there hanged him to a tree.”  New York Times, September 12, 1885 “On Sunday last week, about twenty slaves belonging to citizens of Boone county, escaped from their masters.  They belonged to different individuals, and so well was the plan of escape matured, that at last accounts, nothing had been heard of them.  They were without doubt aided by Abolitionists of Ohio or Indiana.  The people of Boone county, a may well be supposed, are justly excited and indignant at this new and heavy outrage upon their rights.” 
 from the Louisville Daily Courier, April 11, 1853.
Alleged 1838 escape of Boone County slaves reported here. “$100 REWARD.  Runaway from the farm of  owned by Alexander Marshall, deceased, on the 31st day of August, 1845, a negro boy by the name of George, about 5 feet 2 or 3 inches high; 16 years old; tolerably dark, heavy set boy for that age; had on a linen shirt and pants, yellowish linsey [*rmus (sp??)], no hats no shoes. The supposition is that he was aided away.  The above reward will be given if taken out of State, and $25 if taken in the State  and secured in any jail so that I can get him again. WM MARSHALL, Boone co., Sept. 13, 1845” in the Licking Valley Register, September 13, 1845
“A gentleman writes us from Petersburg, Boone County, Kentucky, that the negro boy who murdered Miss Bryant, of Florence, about a month since, was named Joseph, and was the property of Mr. Marcus. The jury valued the fellow at $900.” Cincinnati Daily Enquirer, February 20,1858
A Brief History of Slavery in Boone County, by Merrill Caldwell, is here. (pdf)
“Sewell, of Boone county, Ky., was brought before the U. S. Commissioner at Covington, Ky., yesterday, charged with refusing to allow a negro’s to vote at the recent election, while acting as Judge of the election. He denies that he refused an negroes vote, but admits that he told one who asked him if he had a right to vote that he had not understood the laws of Kentucky.” Sacramento Daily Union, August 25, 1870 “The boy that carried meat to General Washington’s camp is dead, after worrying through 107 years of his troubled life. His name was Uncle Bob Sleet, and he was black and lived in Boone county, Kentucky.” Indianapolis News, March 8, 1872
Boone County man values his slave over an Irishman, here. Ads like this are common in post-Civil War African-American newspapers.
Alcohol leads to a failed slave escape, here. Jesse Johnston steals his daughter. From slavery. Here.
In 1854, nine Boone County slaves attempt an escape to Canada, but don't make it.  Story here, and, , a different viewpoint on the story is here, and another version here. Courts were not on the side of slaves, or former slaves. An example.

“The following is a copy of a notice posted up in several parts of Boone County, and sent to many negroes: ‘Notis too Git.—As you hev bin Runin at large for some time, you hed better gather up your duds, and leave for parts unnon, or you will get hell under the shirt, and that by the tenth of next month. Don't fail to go.’” National Anti-Slavery Standard. October 12, 1867

"Mr. Hollis, from Boone county., Ky., was in the city yesterday in search of a runaway negro, who has been missing since Monday, and who, he states, he believes to have been enticed away by a book peddler, who was about the premises the Saturday previous. No tidings, however, could be obtained of the absconded chattels and effects, and Mr. Hollis returned home satisfied that he has been passed through the underground railroad.” Louisville Daily Courier, June 23, 1860
Lawyers of Boone County, 1872, here.
Boone County man treats mentally disabled white man as one of his slaves, here. It's not a pleasant read. Two slaves captured. The first day story. The real story.
Yet more Boone County slave escapes, here, and here, and here, and here and here and here. A Freedman's Bureau (Wikipedia) report of a Boone County incident is here.
A short slavery remembrance is here. Several items on slavery in Boone County can be found on this site.
“In spite of paid night patrols, Boone County slaveholders lost large numbers of their slaves to the Underground Railroad of Lawrenceburg, Aurora and Rising Sun, especially after Elijah Anderson moved to Lawrenceburg. In 1852, it was announced that 29 runaways had escaped in three months; in 1853 it was announced that 40 fugitives had escaped from Northern Kentucky.” -uncredited clipping in the Lawrenceburg (Ind.) Public Library “Judge Menzies of Boone county, Kentucky, an elder in the Presbyterian Church, and a slaveholder, told me that he knew some overseers in the tobacco growing region of Virginia, who, to make their slaves careful in picking the tobacco, that is, taking the worms off, (you know what a loathsome thing a tobacco worm is) would make them eat some of the worms, and others who made them eat every worm missing in the picking.” The Anti-Slavery Examiner, January 1, 1839

 

“Some five or six years ago Joshua Zimmerman, of Boone county, Ky., brought his favorite servant, Billy, with his family, seven or eight in number, to Ohio, where he settled there on a farm he purchased expressly for their benefit. A few days ago, during the holidays, several of his servants (9 in number), and among them some of the remainder of Billy's family, petitioned for leave to make a visit to the Ohio branch of the family, which was granted, the master furnishing them with a pass to cross the river, and the farm horses and wagon. When they arrived at the end of their journey they wrote to their atmosphere of Ohio was more congenial than the corn fields of Kentucky, and that if he would send for his team it would be forthcoming, but they respectfully declined returning his service.” Louisville Daily Courier, January 15, 1851, reprinting an item from the Cincinnati Gazette of the 13th.

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Boone County, Kentucky 

The Kentucky Highway Department is proud of upgrading from
mules to mechanization in this 1923 Boone County image.

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Goodwood Young Woeful

Trotting horses and their breeding was serious business in Boone County in the 1870's.

An article on the outcome of the Northern Kentucky Trotting Association Meet in Florence is here.

And this article lists the six - that's 6 - trotting tracks in Boone County in 1870.

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Rev. John Peck, Cazenovia, New York reports on evangelical doings in Gallatin and Boone in 1818, here.
When the Presbyterians in Philadelphia sent out missionaries, in 1811, where did they send them? Boone County. And yet, by1814, it doesn't seem like the missionaries had much of an effect. Here.

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Stage

The stage coach from Lawrenceburg, through
Burlington and Florence to Cincinnati. In 1835.
Rising Sun Times, 1835

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18 year old Malie said no, but her 17 year old sister Annie had a different idea altogether. It's a story of true love (not!), here. The Boone County Gold Rush, here. The 1930 Boone County Recorder Historical Edition had this synopsis of Boone County.

Cave Johnson came to Kentucky in 1779, and died at North Bend in 1850.  The Boone County Recorder published some of his reminiscences, and those can be read here. (pdf)

Most states track the largest tree of each species in the state.  Kentucky's list is at this site, and you'll find Boone Co has the largest Red Buckeye, and the largest Northern Red Oak in the state.

The steamer General Pike was charged with distributing relief supplies at the height of the 1884 flood.  Read about it’s stop in Bromley, Constance, Stringtown, and Taylorsport here.
In 1937 UK released surveys of known archaeological sites by county.  Boone County’s is here. (pdf) Boone County farmers want to know when “they may expect their homes ruthlessly invaded by unfeeling monopolists.” More here.
“At a celebration of a Baptist Association in Louisville, the Rev. J. A. Kirtley, of the North District Association, was called to the front and received recognition of having been part or of the church at Bullitsburg thirty-one years and of the Big Bone Church for thirty-five years. Dr. T. E. Eton said that it was ‘remarkable for a man to serve one church for thirty one years and another for thirty-five years and yet the churches did not kill the pastor, nor the pastor the churches.’” J. H. Spencer, in his A History of Kentucky Baptists
In 1906, the Courier-Journal published a list of out-of-state residents who would come home to Boone County.
Ellis Cummins Crawford (of Behringer-Crawford fame) wrote about the Rogers Site, an Indian Mound Excavation, between Petersburg and Grant.  It's here.  (pdf) In 1930, Kentucky Progress Magazine ran a feature letting each of Kentucky's counties list their accomplishments for 1929.  What Boone County came up with is here. (pdf) The Kentucky Department of Agriculture's assessment of agriculture in Boone County, in 1898-1899 can be found here. (pdf)

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UK excavated a number of Adena Culture era (c. 1000 - 200 BC) mound around 1940.  Boone County has more of these sites than most counties in the Adena area.

Boone County, Kentucky Boone County, Kentucky
The Crigler Mounds are
on top of the hill between
Taylorsport and Constance

The Hartman Mound
is three miles northeast
of Petersburg, overlooking
Lawrenceburg.

Boone County, Kentucky

Boone County, Kentucky
The Robbins Mounds are
2 miles northeast of Big Bone
A second view of the
Robbins Mounds, about 2 miles nw of Big Bone

Wm. S. Webb and John B. Elliott were in charge of the Robbins mound, above. Their conclusions, published by UK in 1942, are here (pdf).


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Boone County, Kentucky Boone County, Kentucky  
The Riley Mounds were
7 miles southwest of Union
Map Showing Ft. Ancient
Sites in Boone Co.

 

  Underground Railroad,Boone County, Kentucky Underground Railroad,Boone County, Kentucky Underground Railroad,Boone County, Kentucky Underground Railroad,Boone County, Kentucky Underground Railroad,Boone County, Kentucky
The folks at the Boone County Public Library put together this nifty pamphlet on the
Underground Railroad in Boone County. An enlargement of the map is here.

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“Col . Mark Mundy, accompanied by a considerable force of men, left Camp King on Monday for Burlington, in Boone county, which is nine miles from Florence.  The object of Col. Mundy’s expedition is to break up a gang of Secessionists in the neighborhood of Burlington who have lately been threatening to attack a party of Union soldiers stationed there, and intended for Col. M.’s regiment.  No intelligence has been received from the expedition as yet.”
 from the Courier-Journal, November 13, 1861, reprinting an item from the Cincinnati Enquirer
  Incidents like the following were common in the period, as people rebelled against privately owned turnpikes, which were almost always poorly maintained:

“Covington, Ky., July 13. – The pattering of hoofs of fleet-footed horses bearing masked riders awakened the farmers near Constance, Ky. The toll gates at Idlewild on the Burlington road and at the Bullitsville and Dry Creek pike were destroyed. The mysterious horsemen of the night, numbering about thirty, rode swiftly to Constance and Belleview, and posted a warning on the gate forbidding the collection of any more tolls.” Courier-Journal, July 14, 1914
Night Riders Destroy several Boone County toll gates in 1914, here.   “B. B. Hume, the greatest horseman that Boone County ever knew, has sold half his interest in the Allphin & Hume Livery & Sale Stable at Walton to Scott Chambers of Petersburg, an experienced undertaker, who with ex-sheriff B. B. Allphin will engage in the undertaking business in conjunction with their undertaking business. The Cincinnati Coal and Coke Co. are negotiating with Mr. Hume to take charge of their stables but he is undecided yet.”  from the Warsaw Independent, January 20, 1906
A.M. Yealey writes about the toll gates in Boone County, here.
Paul Tanner writes about Boone County's  Toll roads.  Read it here. (pdf)
An early newspaper, published by the Lutheran Churches of Boone County, was the Boone County Banner.  It's on microfilm at UK, or in the libraries in Covington or Limaburg.  Over the Banner's several year run, c. 1896-1899, it published the history of Lutherans in Boone County.  It's in 24 parts, over that many issues, and is WAY more than we ever want to read, let alone type, but if you're interested . . .  It also has a lot of Boone County school news.  And at least one complaint per issue about the muddy state of the roads in Boone County. “Judge O. P. Hogan [of Williamstown], in addition to his stage lines between Covington and Burlington and Walton and Williamstown, has started another line between the latter points, thus giving the people along that route a morning and evening line both ways.  He has also started a line between Williamstown and Georgetown three times a week.  The three latter lines all make close connections with trains at Walton.” 
 From the Covington Journal, May 31, 1873.

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Boone County was formed from a part of Campbell County in 1799.  It was the 30th county to be formed in Kentucky, and is named for, uh, Daniel Boone. (You knew that, right?)  More info?  Google lists about 1,390,000 or so mentions for Dan'l, here, or, you can read his bio.  That's a link to a good Boone biography at Amazon on the right. Recommended.

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Boone County, Kentucky Boone County, Kentucky

 Program from Boone County Negro School, 1930

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Boone County, Kentucky Boone County, Kentucky Boone County, Kentucky Boone County, Kentucky
Cover Boys Girls Ads

The Boone County Basketball Tournament.  Date?

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Boone County, Kentucky Boone County, Kentucky
A 1923 Boone County
Map, before I-75, before
 US 42, and before
the airport.
Topographic Map
of northeastern
 Boone County
from c. 1912

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James Duvall's Baptist History Homepage has a large collection of the histories
of virtually ever Baptist Church that was ever in Boone County,  plus biographies
 of many of the notable figures of those churches.  Check out his site here.

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Boone County, Kentucky

This map from the 1914 Statistical Atlas of the US and identifies the absolute center
of the US population in Boone County, Kentucky in 1880.  The exact spot is near an
airport viewing area near the south end of Mineola Pike.  There's an historical marker there.

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There are seven other Boone Counties in the USA:

Boone County, Arkansas Boone County, Missouri Boone County, Illinois
Boone County, Indiana Boone County, Nebraska Boone County, Iowa
Boone County, West Virginia

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You can get information on Boone County ancestors by subscribing to the mailing list created for that
purpose.  You'll get periodic information, and can submit your own questions, all via email.  Sign up here for
Boone County. Here is a list of all available lists on Kentucky.

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William Fitzgerald's Place Names in
Boone County is here.  (pdf)

Phone numbers used to have
 letters in them? Here.

Robert Ellis' Boone County - Boom County, from 1955, is here. (pdf)

Judge acquits murderer in Boone
 County in 1858, story here

Boone County Officials, 1847, here.

The story of the lynching of Charles Dickson
 in Boone County, in 1884, here.

A soldier with the Union 103rd camps at Snow's Pond in 1862. Read his letter to the newspaper here. More about the skirmish at Snow's Pond, at Kensington, September 25, 1862 between Richwood and Walton is at this site. The story of the lynching of Willis Jackson
 in Boone County, in 1879, here.

Boone County sites placed on the National Register of Historical Places are at this site.

Kathryn Boyd has written a piece on Price Pike and its people, which is here. (pdf) In 1969, Edna Talbott Whitley compiled a list of Cabinetmakers in Kentucky.  The Boone County portion of that list is here.
150 mounted Guerillas, in 1861, mostly from Boone County, head south. It doesn't go well. Details.    
An 1862 notice of Civil War activity near Florence is here.

A List of the Boone County Historical Markers is at this site.

Prof. A. M. Yealey writes on Civil War events in Boone County, here. (pdf)  His History of Boone County is here.  (pdf)
Bonds of Boone County Tavern Keepers from 1869 - 1870 are listed here. Short biography of Boone County's Brigadier General E. R. S. Canby can be found here. (pdf) A newspaper article from 1861 about possible Civil War trouble in Florence.  Here. (pdf)
In 1894, the Cincinnati Enquirer cites a record of lynching going on over in Boone County in 1894.  Story here. A gas balloon travels to Florence in 1877. Story's here. Who went to the penitentiary from Boone County from 1808 to 1830, and why?  There's a list, here.
    “Dr. Baker spent Sunday in Boone county. The friends he visited live eight miles from the railroads, and to take a train from this city it is necessary to ride a distance in a buggy. “They are the roughest roads I ever saw,’ said Dr. Baker yesterday afternoon. ‘I got up this morning at 5 o’clock and drove over to the station in a buckboard. Those roads up there in that part of the country are nothing but places where people walk by agreement. Generally they are rocks and boulders, but now and then there are depressions, which do the work just as effectively. They don’t make springs on their buggies up there, because springs will break.”  From the Courier-Journal, August 25, 1903
An Account of the First Boone Countians: An Account of the Prehistory of Boone County is here. (pdf)   How Bullock Pen got its name, here. Boone County Historical Society's 1958 booklet of essays on Florence histories is here.  (pdf)

You can read a proposal to build the Covington, Big Bone, and Carrollton Railroad, here.

In 1919, there was a farm census,
counting livestock, crops and farms. 
Boone County's is here.

A List of Boone County Cemeteries is at this site.  You will also want to look at this site.

A list of the first automobiles registered  for Boone County in 1910 is here. Random Boone County News, circa 1813, is here. Read about glaciations in Boone County, here.

Visit Philip Naff's In The Region, a site  devoted to Boone County History  and Genealogy, here.

Boone County Cemetery Records are at this site.

D. B. Wallace wrote a short description of Boone County in 1917.  It's here(pdf)
“The Cincinnati and Suburban Telephone Company yesterday began making connections with the Boone County (Ky.) Telephone Company, which has recently changed to the Bell Telephone Company System.” from the Cincinnati Enquirer, May 6, 1903
 From 1908 comes M. C. Norman's history and description of Boone County. Here. Fattest man in the state of Kentucky dies in Bullitsville, story here. The disastrous ice gorges on the Ohio River in 1917, here.
Boone County's Catherine Appel led one very interesting life. Read about her here. “Several hundred white and black laborers have passed through town this week on their way to work on the Cincinnati Southern railroad, in Grant county; about two hundred carts, with mules and drivers, also passed. It looked very much like ‘war times’ to see the long procession of carts and wagons.” Courier-Journal, June 21,1875, quoting the Boone County Journal.
Boone County deploys a small army of game wardens to control influx in Hoosiers hunting in Boone County in 1903. Story here. Bank assets in 1907 are concentrated in Walton and Burlington. More banks are in the river towns than not. Details.  Directions for how, in 1898, to go from Cincinnati to Burlington, and back, on a bicycle. Here. Out thru Florence/Limaburg; back thru Hebron/Constance
A site dedicated to the bridges of
Boone County is here.
The Dinsmore House's site is here. This site gives an account of the
exploding of the steamer Fanny Fern
at North Bend in 1858.
A status report from the Superintendent of Schools in Boone County from 1900 is here. And 1907 is here. There were 41 one room schools in Boone County in 1897.  The full list is here. Partial map of Boone County,
from 1804, here. (pdf)
The Louisville Post's Ralph Coghlan writes a description of Boone County in 1923. Here. Agnes Chandler Kenney was interviewed about her days teaching in a one-room school in Boone county from 1918-1928. Read it here. (pdf) The Kentucky Opportunities Department of Associated Industries of Kentucky this description of Boone County in 1927.
Boone County Historic Preservation Review Board's Boone County Heritage site is here. Ann Lutes' History of Florence is here(pdf) Ann Lutes' Brief History of Boone
County is here. (pdf)
Mrs. Elizabeth Goodridge Nestor writes on the Old County Fairs Held in Florence, Kentucky, here(pdf) In 1914, here’s what the L&N’s Industrial Freight and Shipper’s Guide had to say about Verona and Walton Around 1951, eighty year old Mabel G. Sayre wrote her autobiography, My Life In Boone County, More Than Sixty-Three Years.  You can read it here(pdf)

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Boone County, Kentucky

Kentucky Progress Magazine named R. B. Huey as one of 12 Master Farmers
in the state of Kentucky in January, 1931.

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Boone County, Kentucky

Steamer Thomas Sherlock at Parlor Grove

Before King's Island, before Coney Island, and even before the Ludlow Lagoon, there was Boone County's
Parlor Grove Amusement Park.  Read all about it, here.

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Boone County, Kentucky

An ad for the 1870 Fair  


Boone County, Kentucky

An ad for the 1877 Fair  

Boone County, Kentucky The Boone County Fair is currently in at least it's fourth location. 
You can see near Kentaboo on this early Lake Atlas map at the left
an early location called Fair Grounds. 

Boone County, Kentucky

The Boone County Fair, circa 1915.  This is the grandstand referred to below.
Boone County, Kentucky Boone County Fair, at Florence, 1907.  The Florence Fair Grounds were
in a triangle roughly defined by US 25, US 42, and Circle Drive (hence the
street named Fair Court in that section).  There was a large open arena
with covered grandstands and a large 2 story bandstand in the center. 
There was as fair here from 1895 to 1932
Boone County, Kentucky Boone County Harvest Home Fair was on Limaburg Road, home to the
Boone County Fair before it's current location.  It was here from 1935
to 1940. The fair was  just a one-day affair in those years.
Renting Harvest Home was a hassle for the fair, and in 1939 and 1941, the fair was held at the Burlington School.  The current fairgrounds were purchased in 1942, and the fair has been there since.  The old fair grounds in Florence were finally sold off in 1944.
  “The North Kentucky Agricultural Fair will be held at Florence, Boone county, on the 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th of next month. A large attendance is expected, and ample accommodations have been made to accommodate all who go.” Louisville Daily Courier, September 21, 1855
Elizabeth Goodridge Nestor wrote a few words on old fairs in Boone County,  Read them here. (pdf)
“The Kentucky North Bend Agricultural Society hold their annual exhibition at Florence, Boone county, Kentucky, on Tuesday and Wednesday, the 23rd and 24th of September”. The Indiana Palladium (Lawrenceburg), September 20, 1834,

 

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Images from the Fair, August 29, 1931

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You can sign up to get on the Boone County Genealogical Mailing
List by the following the instructions you'll find here.

The Kentuckiana Digital Library has a number of Boone
County images.  Quality is erratic, but it's worth a look, here.

The Boone County Roots Web site is here.

The Biography section of Roots Web for Boone County Citizens is here.

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This list of Boone County deaths from WWII is from the National Archives. There's a key
to what the various abbreviations mean here, and the actual list is here.

The World War I list is here.

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Can you name the fifty-five (56!) town names in Boone
 County that have had US post offices? That list is here.

There's a list of the 14 Boone County post offices of 1885, listed by the amount of revenue each generated.  Here.

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Detailed Presidential voting statistics from Boone County are here.

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Kenny Price sings Boone County Sheriff
Price was a successful country music singer from Florence.
Read more about him on his Wikipedia page, here.

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Boone County, Kentucky

from Trow's Legal Directory of Lawyers in the United States, 1875

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C. 1928, the Kentucky Opportunities Department published a fact sheet about Boone
County for potential businesses that might be interested.  You can read it here(pdf)

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“Abner Gaines was the contractor for carrying mail from Georgetown to Cincinnati, Ohio, three times a week
and back, in four-horse post coaches, from 1st January, 1828 to 31st December, 1831, at a compensation of one thousand
seven hundred and ninety dollars per annum.

“On the 8th October, 1831, he was allowed for carrying three additional mails a week between Gaines' cross roads [Walton] and
Burlington, twelve miles, from 1st January, 1828, to 31st December, 1831 at the annual rate of $144.40.”
both from the Public Documents of the 23rd Congress, December 1, 1834

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“When people discovered last Thursday morning that about three inches of snow had fallen during the night before there was a great surprise.” 
Boone County Recorder, May 6, 1908.

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“Petersburg, Ky., - The Boone County Telephone Company will extend its lines to Belleview and Rabbit Hash, which connection will be made with the Southern Indiana Association by cable under the Ohio river.”The American Telephone Journal, 1902

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Boone County, Kentucky Boone County, Kentucky 

We're guessing on these two.  We're convinced it's the same bridge (look at the tree branches), but the caption, “9 miles south of Covington on the Louisville Road” is a puzzler.  Our best guess is Gunpowder at US 42, but if you think otherwise, drop us an email.  In any event, they are both from 1929.  You can see an earlier bridge in the background in the picture on the left.

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Additional Links that apply to all of Northern Kentucky Views, and may or may not
be related to Boone County, are on the main Links & Miscellany page, here.

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