l and N Bridge
a.k.a., The Purple People Bridge

The L&N Bridge The L&N Bridge The L&N Bridge
The L&N Bridge, back
when the L&N used it
L & N Bridge, Newport The L. & N. Bridge Between
Newport and Cincinnati

Newport

The KCRR Bridge

The L&N Bridge The L&N Bridge
These are from old stereoview cards, circa 1880.  At the time these were made, it was the KCRR Bridge - the Kentucky Central Railroad.  L&N bought the old Kentucky Central Railroad in 1888. The KCRR was the L&N line that ran from Newport, south, through Falmouth, Paris, and on to Danville.

  

The L&N Bridge The L&N Bridge The L&N Bridge The L&N Bridge The L&N Bridge
The Louisville and Nashville
 Railroad Bridge 
c. 1930 We believe these are the L&N Bridge

Campbell Frill Line

1937 Flood

The Island Queen, marooned by the high waters of the 1937 flood between the L&N Bridge and the Central Bridge. That's the L&N Bridge on the Ohio side. from a Paul Lind post on Facebook

 

The L&N Bridge The L&N Bridge The L&N Bridge
The KCRR Bridge, as seen from
the Cincinnati side, circa 1880
The L & N Bridge, the
Ohio Side, c. 1910

 

The L&N Bridge The L&N Bridge L & N Bridge

The Ohio end of the L&N Bridge, c. 1880's

Campbell Frill Line

The L&N Bridge

L & N Bridge Data
 from the US Army, Chief of Engineers, 1934

 

The L&N Bridge

L & N Bridge from Newport
an etching by E. T. Hurley
from a 1919 book of sketches by Hurley, with texts by James Green.
You can read Green's text to this picture here.

 

The L&N Bridge The L&N Bridge The L&N Bridge

These old stereoviews are c. 1880/1890

Campbell Frill Line

“The first lady to cross the new bridge between Cincinnati and Newport was Miss Williams, of New Liberty, Owen county, Kentucky, who was accompanied by her lover, Mr. J. Ellis, with whom she was escaping to the Ohio side from parents who ‘refused their consent to the match.’ They crossed over Wednesday on the officers train, accepting the invitation of Dr. Green, president of the Short-line road.” Courier-Journal, March 20, 1872  
During the construction of the bridge, a steamboat hull was found at the bottom of the river which proved to be the wreck of the Moselle, on April 2, 1832. A Cincinnati Enquirer 1900 article
 on Ohio River bridges is here.
The LC&L Bridge (Louisville, Cincinnati and Lexington) Bridge, later Kentucky Central, later L&N first opened on March 20, 1872.  It was the Ohio River's fifth railroad span, after other ones in Steubenville, Bellaire, Parkersburg, and Louisville.  Purvis' Newport Kentucky: A Bicentennial History reports that this bridge "stimulated such rapid growth that Newport's population continued increasing at a faster pace than Cincinnati's in the 1870s. Newport would rank as one of the country's hundred largest cities by 1880."
"The reconstruction of the approaches of this bridge was practically completed at the end of December.  The strengthening of the four river spans during the early summer will complete the project." L & N Annual Report, 1924 The bridge had its piers enlarged from 1895-1897, and also replaced the trusses with bigger and better ones.

Campbell Frill Line