Warsaw, Kentucky

Warsaw, Kentucky     left, The courthouse used to face the river.  This is what was then - c. 1880 - the back of the courthouse (now the front), with a drug store on the southeast corner of the square.  A little more info is here. That's Craig's Hardware in the far back, between the two.

 

right, This is a privy that used to sit on the southwest corner of the court house square. There was, earlier, a jail on this site, and it's unknown whether any part of this structure was a part of that jail.     Warsaw, Kentucky

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Warsaw, Kentucky  Warsaw, Kentucky

I.O.O.F. Opera House 

The I.O.O.F. is International Order of Odd Fellows [Wikipedia]. An Opera House at this time in US history should *not* be thought  to have very much, if anything, to do with fat ladies in Viking Helmets, singing in Italian.  They were used for all kinds of high brow and low brow performances, entertainments and  traveling shows.

Most towns the size of Warsaw had an opera house. The programs below are the type of fare you could typically find at a small town opera house:


 

 

 

Warsaw, Kentucky

 

 

Warsaw, Kentucky

Warsaw, Kentucky

 

 

Warsaw, Kentucky

 

 

Warsaw, Kentucky

Not all of these are programs from the Opera House, but most are.  Another one here.

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Warsaw, Kentucky Warsaw, Kentucky
Gallatin County Jail
. . . a personal note on this one, here.
Gallatin County Jail

 

Warsaw, Kentucky Warsaw, Kentucky Warsaw, Kentucky
The Alerts Base Ball
Team, 1906
Warsaw Baseball,
unknown year
The 1905 Warsaw Baseball
Team, details here.

  

Warsaw, Kentucky Warsaw, Kentucky
Fire Scene. November 26, 1939. The full story is here. Gallatin County Fair, May, 1931. We assume in Warsaw . . .

 

Warsaw, Kentucky Warsaw, Kentucky Warsaw, Kentucky
That's Downtain Jones
driving the horses, 1920's
Warsaw, “an early 1900 Fire Engine,”
is actually from 1890 
David Webb gives me the scoop
on who and where,  read it here. The
caption is also thanks to him.
The first Warsaw Fire Engine, c. 1890, made it to 1942, when it was donated to a scrap drive to support the war effort. 
Read all about, in this story from the Times-Star in 1942, here.

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Warsaw town marshal tries to shoot his wife, here. “Honorable slaveholder” does the right thing, c. 1865,  here.
“Warsaw, Ky., Aug. 4. - About 2,000 persons attended a meeting here on last Tuesday evening when a speaker addressed the audience on Americanism. He was greeted with applause many times during his address. Immediately following the close of the talk a big fiery cross was burned on a hill near the spot where the meeting was held.” Fiery Cross, Official newspaper of the Ku Klux Klan, August 10, 1923
The first (?) town ordinances of Warsaw, from 1833, including a slut tax, here. “The ladies and gentlemen of Warsaw raised by their
festival $230 for Southern relief.” Courier-Journal, July 22, 1867
A 1926 history of the Warsaw Women's Club is here. Con men caught in 1894 Warsaw, here.
Thieves caught, 1858, escaping Warsaw, here.
In 1904, G. F. G. reminisces about the Warsaw of old, here. An unnamed correspondent describes, in detail, the Warsaw of 1880, here.
Warsaw was established as an official town on December 7, 1831, as Fredericksburg. Denied the name by the Post Office, it was renamed Warsaw on December 12, 1831 (Acts 1831). It incoporated on February 16, 1838 (Acts, 1837/38) and again on February 20, 1839 (Acts 1838/39). Full details on the named ing Warsaw here.
"[An African-American Masonic] lodge, Rubicon No. 27,was established at Warsaw, Kentucky, in [1871].  Its original officers were: Gleming Cousins, Worshipful Master, E. J. Burton, Senior Warden; Nelson Jack, Junior Warden, W. F, Cousins, Secretary; and C. Robinson, Treasurer."from The History of the Prince Hall Grand Lodge of the State of Ohio.
Warsaw postmaster charged with fraud, here. Downtown Warsaw had notable fires in 1884;    1912;    1932;   another version of the fire in 1932, and    1939.
“The Bank Whigs in the following, among many other places, have disgraced themselves by burning President Tyler in effigy, in consequence of his veto of [Henry] Clay's Bank bill: Washington city, Nashville, Tn., Louisville, Ky., St. Louis, Mo., Circleville, O., Elkton, Md., Warsaw, Ky., and Russelville, O.” Indiana State Sentinel, September 21, 1841

 

BiCentennial Brochure BiCentennial Brochure BiCentennial Brochure BiCentennial Brochure

Brochure from the Warsaw Bicentennial Celebration

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