Officially the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge, and usually just called the Roebling Bridge, or the Suspension Bridge, John Roebling called it simply

Suspension Bridge,Covington, Kentucky

Construction Suspension Bridge

    

Suspension Bridge
Suspension Bridge
Construction Views, June, 1866.
We assume the three images on the left are all the same picture, cropped to different effects.

 

Suspension Bridge

Scene of the 1896 bridge re-building. The cloudy air may be fog, but more likely pollution - they burned lots of coal in those days.
from a Facebook post by David Rutherford

 

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An 1868 sketch of the
Suspension Bridge
c. 1870's c. 1870's

 

   

Suspension Bridge

  

Suspension Bridge
Suspension Bridge
19th century An early painting
of the bridge.
The Toll Gate
for Pedestrians, 
from Harpers New Monthly, 1883

 

Suspension Bridge

Suspension Bridge from the Newport Barracks

 

Suspension Bridge
A painting by Milton O'Dell (external link)

 

 

Stobart

Stobart Stobart
John Stobart (Wikipedia) a contemporary painter of old time riverfronts, has included the Suspension Bridge in a number of his works. His online gallery is here.

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“When we look upon the massy stone piers of the Cincinnati and Covington Suspension Bridge, and see the workman busily engaged in dressing the huge rocks, and placing them in position where they are to remain visible to the mortal eye through all the mutations of time - century after century – we cannot but feel that over the minds of the workmen there comes now and then a sweep of lofty thoughts concerning the grandeur and long-enduring character of the work on which they are thus engaged.  As a handsomely dressed rock is placed into position, we can imagine the thoughtful mason to soliloquize thus: These outer rocks which occupy so prominent a position will be gazed upon by the children of my great-great-grandchildren.  All my posterity to the latest generations will have it for their boast that an ancestor of theirs helped build this great and wonderful work.  I am leaving marks of my life’s doings while in the world and I am not ashamed of the record which day to day I am making up.  I feel a glorious consciousness within me – that I have lived for some purpose – that I have not lived in vain.”   From the Saturday Evening American, (Covington), August 27, 1864


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Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge
The Great Bridge, c. 1880-90, All of these are old stereoview cards and, with the ones below, and are indicative of the
bridge's fame, and importance as a tourist attraction in the late 1800's.

 

   

Suspension Bridge

Suspension Bridge

Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge

Front and back of an old stereoview card
Note the sign on the upper right of the bridge.

More old stereoviews

 

 

Suspension Bridge

Suspension Bridge

Suspension Bridge

Suspension Bridge

Suspension Bridge

A close up of the
Suspension Bridge
Note the flooring of the
bridge, originally made of wood.
More old stereoviews

 

 

Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge
Drawing, c. 1880's Both are c. 1880's

 

1890 Flood Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge

   

Suspension Bridge
Suspension Bridge
1890 Flood, 56.9 Feet In the 1884 Flood These stereoview cards are from the late 1800's

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Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge
1898 1912 c. 1910
  The most common of all Covington postcards
is a variation of the above two shots of the
Suspension Bridge

 

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Crossing Suspension Bridge, circa 1903 “Jamming Barges Under the Suspension Bridge”
a painting by H. H. Wessel, 1921



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Suspension Bridge and
Covington Riverfront
 
Suspension Bridge and
Covington Riverfront
November 16, 1927
unknown year 1928

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Ten things you likely don't know about the Suspension Bridge are here.

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“The Covington and Newport street railroads carry 2,600 passengers per day over the Ohio river suspension bridge.”
from the Louisville Daily Journal, August 19, 1868

frill

Technology, in 1869, brought to bear to prevent trotting across the bridge. Story here.

frill

Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge
In the 1937 Flood
notice the back up into the “Newport fill” on the left picture

 

Suspension Bridge 

It's true that you could cross the Suspension Bridge in the 1937 flood,
but it's not like they didn't have to lend some assistance to get'er done.

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Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge
The Green Line Heads for
Latonia, 1938. Note that the
Suspension is a toll bridge
c. 1935, from the
 Ohio side
Looking south toward
Covington, 1931

 

Suspension Bridge
On the Covington side, looking toward Cincinnati.
Steamers on the Ohio side are the America, the
Magnolia, and the Major Anderson


Suspension Bridge 

Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge
from the Ohio side,
c. 1910
Note the huge number of
steamers at the
Cincinnati landing
The Ben Franklin on
the Covington shore
The Indiana passes under
the Suspension Bridge

 

Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge
An early 20th century view A 19th century view.
Note all the steamboats

 

   

Suspension Bridge
Suspension Bridge
The original plan was for
a single tower in the center
of the river.
Suspension Bridge,
1934, from the US Army,
Chief of Engineers

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Suspension Bridge

Suspension Bridge

Suspension Bridge

Suspension Bridge

A citizens group, the Covington-Cincinnati Suspension Bridge Committee, Inc. published this handy guide to the history of the Suspension Bridge.  The two parts on the left are a history of the bridge; the two parts on the right are a walking tour.  You can visit the Committee on the web here.

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The Suspension Bridge was opened on Saturday, December 1, 1866. 46,000 people crossed. The next day was
an unseasonably warm Sunday, and it's estimated that 120,000 people came out. The formal dedication was
the following New Year's Day.
The Ticket, a Covington newspaper, cited an Ohio Law, which said that the Suspension Bridge must charge 15% less
than ferries then operating, and published a comparison of rates to cross the Suspension bridge in 1876, and the
comparable ferry rates from 1863. It's here.
There are several plaques on the ends of the
bridge.  You can see  close-ups of them, here.
John A. Roebling's bio on Wikipedia is here.
The original bridge was painted “Spanish Brown,” thought to be a light brown corrupted by linseed oil
to be a darker brown. From the 1895-1899 reconstruction to the mid-1930's it was black and
white.  From the 1930's to 1976 it was green, and since 1975, it's always been blue.
The Enquirer's 1900 article on Ohio
River bridges is here.
The Covington-Cincinnati Suspension Bridge Committee's site here.
They have lots more bridge pictures, and a nice history of the bridge.

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Suspension Bridge Suspension Bridge
Whatever . . . Last and least.  What
were they thinking?

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