Lusby's Mill, Owen County, Kentucky

Lusby's Mill,

Aerial View of Lusby's Mill
from a Facebook post by the Lusby's Mill page

 

Lusby's Mill, Lusby's Mill,

Lusby's Mill

line

"On Sunday night about 9 o'clock fire took place at Lusby's Mill.  We have no particulars, but learn that Acree &  Kinman's store house, the Masonic Hall, and a Carding machine, all were burned up.  The light was seen at Squire Long's on Twin, sixteen miles off, to the west." The Carrollton Democrat, September 3, 1870
Fire, 1875, here. In 1870, here. History of Lusby's Mill Baptist is here. (pdf)
One room schools combined into the Lusby Central School in 1925: Holbrook School, Fortner school, Lusby one-room school, Elk Ridge School, Smith School, and the Hammond school.
“Miss Allie Martin, of Lusby's Mills, made a quilt containing 4,863 pieces, and the local editor challenged the state to beat it. Miss Allie Gorham, of Paris [Ky], came to the front with a composite bed covering constructed out of 7,048 individual bits of calico, and she is now the champion.” Bismark (ND) Tribune, November 30, 1883
“N. M. Reed, who lives near Lusby's Mill, in Owen County, has caught thirty red foxes since December last.”Courier-Journal, June 2, 1870  
An 1862 Civil War report from Lusby's Mill, here. Lusby's bridge burns, 1926.  Read it here.

line

Lusby's Mills Covered Bridge

Covered Bridge at Lusby's Mill
from a Facebook posting on Kentucky's Covered Bridges - A Baker's Dozen

 

Lusby's Mill, Lusby's Mill,
Gainer's Store, Lusby's Mill, c. 1890 Lusby's Mill, on Eagle Creek, 1918
photo by Paul Sidebottom

line

Lusby's Mill,

Lusby's Mill, c. 1883

line

In January 1948, the Lusby's Mill's Homemakers published a history of the place.
Mrs. Orville Jones wrote on Lusby's Mill's Stores and Storekeepers, here, (pdf), and its churches here (pdf),
and Mrs. Oren Cobb wrote on the Mill and the community, here (pdf),

line

Lusby’s Mill was originally called Cobbs Station, later Cobbs Mill.  The water mill at Cobbs Mill was built for William Jones, but named for his father-in-law, Samuel Cobb, a revolutionary War veteran from South Carolina.  Around 1852 John H Lusby, or perhaps his brother William H, acquired the mill, and re-named it Lusby’s Mill. From Robert Rennick’s Kentucky Bluegrass: A Survey of the Post Offices, Vol. II. 

line