Beaverlick, Ky

Beaverlick Beaverlick
Hughes Chapel, 1930
History of Hughes Chapel is here.
Hughes Chapel
at the nw corner of US 42
and Richwood Road

 

Beaverlick Beaverlick
Beaverlick Baptist Church, 1930 Road Meeting Celebration
 in Beaver, 1930

 

Beaverlick Beaverlick

Beaver-lick Mercantile Company, Incorporated
Proprietor of the store is Mr. J. Merit Jack

Boone Frill

The US Post Office folks recognized the post office here as “Beaver Lick” (two words) from 1843-1895, and,
from 1895 - 1944, as “Beaverlick” (one word).  Then there's above image which says “Beaver-Lick” (with a dash), and the postmark at the top of this page that just says “Beaver.” 

Boone Frill

“The saw-mill of Edward Senour, of Beaver Lick, Boone County, was destroyed by fire last night. 
The loss will be about $700.”  Cincinnati Enquirer, September 6, 1883

Boone Frill

Beaverlick

Looking southwest at Beacon Light

 

Beaverlick Beaverlick Beaverlick
Beacon Lite Motel
11 Units - Strictly Modern
19 Miles south of Cincinnati, Ohio
On Route 42  Phone Walton-1362
Restaurant Adjoining
US 42 at Beacon Light,
at the time US 42 opened
in the Fall of 1939.

    This map shows the beacon light that was on an early US mail air route, which followed
 a straight line between Louisville and Lunken Airport.  This map is from May, 1944.
The stars denote landing sites - note one at Warsaw, one at Beaver, one in Edgewood, and of
course one at Lunken Field.  The purple highlighting shows the flight path, and the purple elliptical
shape denotes a "Fan Marker Beacon" which existed at the place known as Beacon Light.

Boone Frill

Beaverlick Beaverlick
Beaverlick,looking East
Building on left used to be
Millinery Shop, operated
by Jennie Ossman.
J. H. Sleet,
General Merchandise,
Beaver Lick, Kentucky
These two images depict the same building.

 

Beaverlick

Class Picture from Beaver Lick School
Names in the back of this one are here.

 

Duckhead Duckhead
US 42, looking southwest,
Duckhead, 1940
The Duckhead Inn,
also around 1940

Boone Frill

Boone County Recorder travels to Beaver in 1889, here.    

American Society of Equity holds a big rally in Beaver, read it here. If you've not familiar with the A. S. E., you'll want to read this first.

An 1859 Gazetteer lists the merchants of Beaver Lick, here.

“Beaver Lick is one of the most quiet villages on earth, especially on the Sabbath, though two shops are dealing out the deadly drug on week days.  Thanks be to God and honor to the proprietors, not one drop is sold here on Sunday.  We owe it to William Rex Robinson, who came and lectured to us until with tears in their eyes proprietors of liquor promised him they’d vend no more on Sunday.”  from Covington’s Daily Commonwealth, September 16, 1879.

Boone Frill