newport banks

 

 

 

Newport Bank

 

Newport Bank

 

 

Newport Bank

 

Newport Bank

Newport Bank
Newport National
Bank, 1922
Newport National
Bank, 1901
  Newport National Bank,
York and Fifth, Newport
 There's a White Castle's
Hamburgers here today
Newport National Bank
offers bold new technology.
July, 1955

lne

Thanks to Tony Swicer for sending me a truly amazing set of pictures and facts about
 the bank notes of early Campbell County Banks.  It's a pdf.  Good stuff!  See it here.
The German National Bank was shut down by an  embezzling
employee in 1900.  The story is here. (pdf)
The Newport Safety Fund Bank failed on October 17, 1854, the victim of a
banking panic in the western (i.e. west of the Appalachians)  states.
“The handsomest building in Newport is the one put up by the Kentucky State Journal at York and
Bellevue [now Fourth] Streets.  With the First National Bank building at York and Madison [now Fifth],
the square is the handsomest in the city.”  The Commonwealth, September 30, 1885

 

Newport Bank

Central Savings Bank
NE corner of 8th & Monmouth, c. 1937

 

Newport Bank Newport Bank Newport Bank Newport Bank

The American National Bank 
7th and Monmouth, Newport, c. 1951

 

Newport Bank Newport Bank Newport Bank
American National Bank, 1922
Fourth & York
The American National Bank 
c. 1970

 

Newport Bank Newport Bank

 

 

Newport Bank

 

Kentucky Enterprise Savings
and Loan Association
800 Monmouth, Newport
"A Friendly, Insured Federal Association
Built for your Safety and Convenience"
Favorite Federal
Savings & Loan Assoc.
Licking Valley Federal
Savings & Loan Association
14 Carothers Road,
c. 1970

 

Newport Bank Newport Bank

West Side Savings Bank
10th & Columbia
That's Howard Gosney, EVP of the Bank, 1957

lne

"It was about 1837 that the Newport Lyceum was incorporated.  This literary institution soon, by some hocus pocus, turned itself into a bank, with Major Helms as the President and John W. Goddard, Cashier.  The affair soon collapsed, and many fingers were burned.  John W. Tibbatts, one of the mot talented men Newport ever knew, was concerned in the bank, and also in a woolen mill, which stood on part of the ground now occupied by Gaylord's foundry.  Through this agency, the notes of the bank were redeemed in jeans at $1 a yard - a yard of jean for a dollar of Newport Lyceum bank money.  One of these notes are still in existence; one is pasted on the door in Barlow's bar room.”  From Covington's Saturday Advertiser, April 12, 1873

lne