ferries

Ferry

The Minnie
A little background on the Minnie is here.
 

Ferry Ferry

The Leon
 built in 1895, & destroyed by the 1918 ice.

“Cpt. James P. Ash had just launched a new ferry boat at Lamb.  It is named 'Leon' for his only son” 
from a “90 years ago column,” in a news clipping dated September 18, 1986.


 

Ferry Ferry Ferry

The Mary Jo

  

Ferry Ferry Ferry Ferry

The Ohio 
A little background on the Ohio is here.
A former owner of the Ohio has this to say about the image on the far left

 

Ferry

The Indiana, approaches Lamb in 1952
 (perhaps on what may have been it's last run)

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“The Carrollton Democrat says: 'A serious accident occurred at a hay-shed near Wickliffe's ferry the other day, to Samuel Tingle. He was baling hay, when some sweep, getting loose in some way, flew around and struck him, breaking his leg in two pieces.'” Courier-Journal, December 18, 1871 Where was Wickliffe's Ferry? We have no idea. When a serious effort was made to bridge the Ohio between Lamb and Carrollton, the Milton-Madison bridge owners published a booklet on why that was a really bad idea. You can read it here. (pdf)
There has always been random talk about a bridge across the Ohio River at Carrollton, but in 1929, the talked got serious.  You can read about it here. (pdf)  Why the initiative failed, we have no idea, but we note the date is at the onset of the Great Depression. “Ben O'Neill's house at his ferry on the Kentucky river, in Carroll county, was destroyed by fire, and with it, nearly all of its contents.  Loss, $2,500; insurance, $1,000.”  from Covington's Daily Commonwealth March 27, 1883 Northern Kentucky Views is  indebted to Captain Steve and Barbara Huffman for many of the images and most of  the background information on the Carrollton Ferries.  Thanks folks! You can visit  their site,  dedicated to The Barbara H, a stern-wheel towboat,  here.
“Immediately after the organization of [Switzerland] county it began to increase in population, and from 1816 to 1822, towns were laid out in different parts of the county, and in general scene was that of activity, industry and thrift. In 1815, James McIntire laid out the town of Erin, opposite Carrollton, Ky., but was unsuccessful in his attempts to attract population at that point.” An Illustrated History of Indiana, Goodrich and Dewitt, 1875  

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