Ohio river Scenes

Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky

Ele Bowen cruised down the Ohio in 1855, and kept a detailed journal of places he passed.  This is his
drawing of Covington.  You can read his Rambles in the Path of the Steam-Horse in its entirety at Google Books.

 

Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky
The Ohio River, August 24, 1883
at 1 foot, 11  inches, the all time
record low water mark. 
More on this picture is here.
Covington, looking north
from the Licking

 

Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky

Note the coal barges on the Covington side.
Coal is how your ancestors got heat, and if that coal supply was disrupted, say, by a flood, a crisis ensued.

 

intrepid souls Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky
January, 1977. It's not just that it turned cold. For the river to freeze, it had to turn cold and stay cold for weeks and weeks.

 

Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky
Covington Riverfront,
c. 1890's
Covington Riverfront,
 from Cincinnati
Covington from the
 Ohio River, c. 1964

 

Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky

Covington Riverfront, looking through the C & O (Bailey) Bridge

 

Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky
The Covington River Front The Covington River Front The Covington Riverfront,
 from the Marmet Coal Yards
in Cincinnati

 

Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky

An old lithograph of the Covington (far side) and Cincinnati riverfronts.
These old artists' renderings are generally pretty accurate.

 

Riverfront Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky
Believed to be 1945 Taken from the Cincinnati side. 
same photographer; same day, but we don't know the date.
Additional pics of the boat on the right, the Hercules Carrel, are at this site.

 

Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky
The John W. Hubbard
You more likely know it
 as the Mike Fink Restaurant
The Julius Fleischman passes
Covington.   That's Mother of
God in the background.
The Ferry Boat Kenton

 

Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky
The Sultana Burns Outing on the Ohio, c. 1921
note the "Iron Maiden" (diving
 suit) in the background
Mark Twain Excursion Boat

 

Ohio Ri ver Scene

Ohio River Scene

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Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky

The Hattie Brown in the Ice of 1917-18
You can see the Cincinnati and the Louisville, soon to be destroyed (see below) across on the Cincinnati side

 

Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky Ohio River Scene at Covington, Kentucky
Ice on the Ohio Wharf Boat in ice The Cincinnati The Louisville Ice of 1893, looking south
January 21, 1893

In the days of steamboats, floods weren't the major problem (boats float), ice was.  Before today's dams created
larger pools, which freeze less often, ice dams were a huge danger.  The formation of ice crushed wooden
hulls, and when an ice dam gave way, it produced a torrent of ice floes - each of which could be as big as a house - which
tore the bejeezus out of anything and everything in front of it.  The sounds of the ice breaking could be heard
for miles. The ice of 1917-1918, the date of the above pics, was one of the worst to hit this area. When the 1918
dam broke on January 30, 1918, the water in Cincinnati fell from 62 feet to 20 feet in 2 hours;  imagine what
was happening downstream. Note the old Covington Court House in the background in the far left image. 

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“The Horse Ferry Boat, No. 1, is now in complete operation between Cincinnati, Newport, and Covington.  It is so constructed as to accommodate passengers with a safe, speedy, and very comfortable passage; and will carry, with perfect safety, at least two wagons and teams, and ten or fifteen horsemen with any reasonable number of persons.

“The boat will leave the Licking, ever morning at sunrise, and continue to run during the day, except a sufficient time for refreshment at breakfast and dinner, staying fifteen minutes at each shore.  The bell will ring at her arrival and departure. The  fare will be the same as in other boats.” 
from The Western Spy, Cincinnati, June 15, 1818

Rates on the ferry above were 6 cents per person; eighteen cents for a man and a horse; one
dollar for a horse and wagon; six cents per pig; and eighteen cents per head of cattle.  

More info on the old and new Ohio
River Locks and Dams is here.

A page of steamboat
 links can be found at this site.

“Last year the ferry at Covington
crossed over 120,000 hogs.”
The Covington Journal,January 4, 1851

The problem encountered when visiting the riverfront in 1856?  Too many naked people.  Story here

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